loader image
How to write a book. Step two – Understanding your book’s reader

How to write a book. Step two – Understanding your book’s reader

Welcome to step two of a six part series on how to prepare for the book writing process. If you missed the first article in this series: Step One – How to Begin the Book Writing Process, here’s the link.

Before you can write a book that will be embraced, you must first understand your reader. Keep in mind that there are many ways to gather this information. Some future authors initiate casual conversations, do online research, join topic appropriate groups or create surveys. I suggest all authors start in the bookstore. It’s a great place to begin the journey from where you are now to bestselling author status. While at the bookstore take notice of the huge sections are dedicated to the popular topics.

The following questions are important to first ask yourself and then ask people who might be the market for your book.

Who’s going to read your book?

The first and most important thing is to think about the audience. What interests them? What are their challenges, what excites them and motivates them to do, be and have more? Are they intent on losing weight, having a great relationship, reaching a higher level of success, being able to afford that new car or paying for their kid’s sports season?

Know what interests them

Maybe your audience is other business owners. If so, this should be even easier. What are they interested in? Are they focused on increasing revenue, decreasing costs, gaining the competitive edge, or is it some new industry or legislative change that has them alarmed?

What challenges are they facing?

Keeping an eye on what your readers are experiencing is always a good idea. Often writers find a niche and stay within it so they can focus on a particular market. They easily understand the reader, their challenges and their daily life. This allows the author to offer insightful solutions and increase their own credibility. Finding a niche and sticking with it can lead to “expert” status. Apart from writing, this elevated status could open doors to speaking, training and consulting.

What excites them?

Understanding their hopes, dreams and desires is just as important as knowing the reader’s challenges. By getting a picture of what they are striving for, the writer can shed light on how they might get it. People are frequently too close to their situation to see a clear path to what they want.  While they struggle, an outsider’s viewpoint can steer them in the right direction. A knowledgeable writer, with insights into an audience, will be in a unique position to impact individuals, and the group, while standing out as a leader.

The reader needs to be present at every stage of the writing process. Keeping in touch with them mentally, will keep you on the right track towards delivering a book that is well received and valuable.

You won’t want to miss the next part of this series, Step Three – Starting the Book Marketing Process.

Did you read part one on how to begin your book?

 

About the author
Speaker, author, TV host of Focus Forward, Lauri Flaquer has extensive entrepreneurial and media experience. As founder of Saltar Solutions, she guides her clientele of international business owners to excel as entrepreneurs. Formally in TV production at NBC, CNBC and Bloomberg LP, Lauri produces/ hosts Focus Forward, a show dedicated to helping entrepreneurs soar! Lauri has been the publicist and marketing director for several best-selling book campaigns. To learn more about marketing contact Lauri or Tweet her, @SaltarSolutions.

 

Are you in the process of writing a book, or have you just finished one? We’d love it if you left a comment below, or found us on Facebook or Twitter. And if you think others would find this series useful, go ahead and share :-)

 

 

Planning to write this year? Start here. Step one – How to begin the book writing process

Planning to write this year? Start here. Step one – How to begin the book writing process

Everybody’s doing it. You can’t look at social media, industry journals or a magazine that you don’t see authors using their new books as a means of getting attention. Don’t be jealous! With the help of this article, a topic and a computer, you can do the very same thing.

It’s important to first organize your thoughts around your book. In order to clarify your topic and focus your message, answer the following questions. The more deeply you dig into your motives, the better prepared you will be to take your book idea to the next level.

Book description

Write a short synopsis of the book, just a few paragraphs will do. If you have pages and pages of the description, you haven’t clarified your book enough. Keep writing, rereading and editing to get to the heart of the book.  

Why are you writing this book?

What is your motivation behind this undertaking? This is another question that requires you to get specific. Many people don’t take the time to explore this question and end up with a book that doesn’t grab the reader or help the author reach their personal and professional goals.

Why are you the right person to write this book?

What experiences, education, unique viewpoint, or successes regarding the topic do you have to share? Why are you the right person to deliver this message or address this topic?

What are you specifically bringing to the reader that they don’t already have?

Are you helping people save time, money, or effort? Are you offering a new way to do something? Are you helping your reader solve a problem, meet a challenge or overcome a roadblock? Maybe you’re just entertaining the reader and that’s okay too.

What are your ideas for marketing your book?

Are there any obvious channels that you can think of, off the top of your head that would help you sell your book? If you have access to lots of people, are a member of a large group or know people who are it’s a good idea to start creating a list. 

What are your wildest dreams as a result of this book?

Many people focus so much on the possible that they under estimate their book and themselves. Don’t start the book writing process with a compromise. Dream big and you may reach some pretty lofty goals.

Congratulations!

Now that you’re well on your way to solidifying your message and initial ideas for your book, you’ll want to stay tuned for Step Two – Understanding Your Reader.

 

About the author
Speaker, author, TV host of Focus Forward, Lauri Flaquer has extensive entrepreneurial and media experience. As founder of Saltar Solutions, she guides her clientele of international business owners to excel as entrepreneurs. Formally in TV production at NBC, CNBC and Bloomberg LP, Lauri produces/ hosts Focus Forward, a show dedicated to helping entrepreneurs soar! Lauri has been the publicist and marketing director for several best-selling book campaigns. To learn more about marketing contact Lauri or Tweet her, @SaltarSolutions.

 

Are you in the process of writing a book, or have you just finished one? We’d love it if you left a comment below, or found us on Facebook or Twitter. And if you think others would find this series useful, go ahead and share :-)

 

 

5 easy ways for writers to source media story leads and opportunities

5 easy ways for writers to source media story leads and opportunities

Are you a writer, journalist or blogger? If you answered ‘yes’, you’ll appreciate the issue of discovering leads, case studies, sources and opportunities. Here’s a fast guide to five top sites that might just help you this week …

 

1. NEWSMODO / Tweet @newsmodo_com

Here publishers send out briefs to freelancers, indicating whether they need story leads or photographs.

It’s a good one to be signed up to as many of the media utilising this service have dollars to spend on your worthy leads, pitches and ideas.

 

2. SOURCE BOTTLE / Tweet @sourcebottle

This one has been a favourite in the southern hemisphere for a while, but its reach is now worldwide.

Essentially, SourceBottle connects expert sources with journalists and bloggers who are after case studies or quotes for stories.

 

3.  RESPONSE SOURCE / Tweet @ResponseSource and @DWPub

ResponseSource is like the UK’s version of SourceBottle, and gives journalists, broadcasters and bloggers fast access to reliable stories, experts, information and case studies.

 

4.  HELP A REPORTER OUT / Tweet @helpareporter

Another of the world’s top ‘lead’ sites, although this one is essentially American-based.

As a writer, you’ll receive emails outlining what media are looking for – sources, pitches, case studies, information – and if you can ‘help them out’, you have the opportunity to respond.

A great resource on how to use HAR is published here

 

5. SOCIAL CALLOUT / Tweet @SocialCallout

A relatively new digital service linking brands to bloggers. As a blogger, you’ll receive notes on which brands are looking for digital/social support, and if your space fits the criteria, you can apply for the opportunity advertised.

 

Want more like this, or do you have any other tips and helpful sites to share? Connect now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

 

Enjoy your week, Sarah x