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How to write a Lonely Planet guide

How to write a Lonely Planet guide

This evening I was lucky enough to attend a seminar, How to write a Lonely Planet guide, hosted by Intrepid Travel and featuring acclaimed author, journalist and presenter, Frances Linzee Gordon.

What she said:

[true sentiments on ‘travel’]

“Travel is addictive because of the adventure, self discovery, serendipity, fun, opportunities and stimulation that every day brings.

Travel is like making a new friend – you always listen out for the place in the news, you want to return, and you care about what happens there.

To write about a place you need to be saturated in it – learn some of the language, speak to/interview everyone, understand general costs of living etc.

Keep an ‘as you go’ diary to note down fresh impressions so when you’re tired and go to write up a feature you don’t forget things. Include details, colour, a local feel. Use the writer’s muscle – the more you use it, the better you are.”

[writer / traveller action points]

  • Keep a Diary – for fresh impressions on the road.
  • If you don’t have writing experience, consider taking a course.
  • Photography course – a great idea because your stories are more marketable with images. Also, you can sell to image libraries (eg. Getty, Lonely Planet) for extra income (because a travel writer’s income is limited).
  • Learn a language(s).
  • Enjoy the moment (adhere to the concept of ‘mindfulness’)– it’s easy to worry about money, going home, terrorists etc. – but stop and take in the amazing things you have in the moment.
  • Choose to support local businesses and industry.
  • Try everything – dance, eat – go outside your personality.
  • Enjoy – be safe without being paranoid, don’t be budget obsessed, be inconspicuous and be open to everything.

 

[Keep in mind]

  • Beware: check local conditions before travel (eg. Disease, weather, crime).
  • Double check passport / copies accessible.
  • You’re more vulnerable to local threats if you look like a tourist. ‘When in Rome’… and be aware of what different clothes, or smoking / drinking in public may represent in some areas of the world.
  • Support is often not readily available so understand what emergency services etc are/aren’t available.
  • Arrange all relevant health vaccinations, dentist etc. 6 weeks prior to leaving.
  • Travel insurance – critical – but also check your insurance covers your proposed activities (eg. If you are going skiing, diving and so on, carefully check the terms because you can be caught out).
  • Research where you’re going.
  • Pack carefully – make a list then pack in ten minutes to avoid unnecessary extras.
  • Be aware of scams.
  • Always tell someone where you’re going.
  • Leave valuables behind, only carry money.
  • Stay in touch with home / leave an itinerary.
  • Make friends with the hotel manager – they are good for safety tips, local information and many other things.

[some final tips]

1. Especially in ‘hot’ places keep an eye on local press and talk regarding what’s going on – they’ll pick up on issues or uprisings etc.  before national or international press.

2. Visit local tourist organisations and introduce yourself, say where you’re going, what you’re doing and ask for a letter for introduction. It can come in handy in sticky situations or if you’re in trouble.

3. 3-second rule (trust your gut) – look someone in the eye for three seconds, make a character judgement – stick with that impression no matter what.

4. Be careful when taking photos – you’re often not concentrating on what’s happening around you in order to capture ‘the shot’, so in pairs keep an eye out for each other so that no one is being robbed while they are photographing something.

5. Photo tips – make people laugh, use alternative angles and look for different places to take photos of famous landmarks (i.e. alternative vantage points from where most tourists are directed to take shots). Always ask for permission before taking someone’s photo.

6. When in a restaurant write notes – you look like a food critic and are more likely to receive better service!

How to write a Lonely Planet guide

Serious about being an author for Lonely Planet? Their recruitment notes on how to write a Lonely Planet guide state:

  • All applications are read: lonelyplanet.com/jobs
  • You must demonstrate passion for travel
  • You must demonstrate destination knowledge
  • Writing experience required
  • Evidence of ‘special expertise’ (eg. Language, rock climbing, diving, other special interests, e.g. Lived, travelled, written; any evidence of independent travel)
  • Always meet deadlines and word count
  • NB. LP publications use simple sentences and language – be mindful they’re usually translated.

 

[This is a re-post from the archives. Originally posted July 13 2011, London]
What didn’t I do in Cairns this past weekend?

What didn’t I do in Cairns this past weekend?

Things to do in Cairns Queensland

The weather has been so perfect here that I decided to take the chopper out for a spin …

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Oh wait, that’s not mine – I get so easily confused these days. Alas, I was on foot on Friday, headed firstly towards Canopy Arts Space on Grafton Street to find out all about Inkfest initiatives (awesome!)  + Inkmasters as part of Festival Cairns.

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Inkfest is an innovative addition to Cairns Festival showcasing the fascinating and diverse artform of printmaking 17 August – 2 September, 2012. The Inkfest program includes a number of inter-related printmaking activities, for indigenous and non-indigenous artists, emerging and experienced professional artists, and community engagement. It includes two exhibitions, at the Tanks Arts Centre and Canopy Artspace (pictured below), where some of the best local print media artists will be showing works alongside Australia’s most celebrated printmakers.

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Visitors are welcome to drop by the gallery on Grafton Street – it’s huge, interesting and informative. Well worth it!

Next on Friday’s adventure …

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It’s not as scary as it looks. A bunch of travel journalists and I visited James Cook University’s Cairns campus to explore some uniquely ‘Tropical North Queensland’ areas of education.

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Baby Nemo! 🙂

We went behind the scenes of a marine research centre that is used to film nature docos including the BBC’s The Great Barrier Reef that aired internationally earlier this year. And we discovered impressive research into the Eliminate Dengue project.

 

It was actually really interesting to hear about this research, and we did learn that mozzies are attracted to those of us who have ‘hotter body temperatures’ or people wearing dark clothes – so be warned.

The aim of the experiment is to breed the dengue gene out of the mozzies that have it, then all these new mozzies are released into the ‘wild’ to hopefully breed with the other evil mozzies. Such amazing stuff – but we don’t envy the poor guys at JCU who are continually getting bitten!

All this talk of mosquitoes made me thirsty, so we decided to nip out for a quiet Friday afternoon drink at The Pier Bar. A few champers later and it was time to dance, so we visited one of my fave clubs in town, The Attic. Even discovered an awesome new mix of Super Bass mixed by Liam Keegan (love it).

Attic DJ you *rock* for sharing Liam’s details with us! Cheers to you 🙂

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YUM.

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OMG… empty much?

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Panic over… thank you kind lady. BTW these fab cocktails (think Appletinis, Cosmos, Martinis) are all just $6 at The Attic on Friday nights – they have a new menu and are testing it out. Bargain!

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We’re looking to reno our bathroom soon (too much The Block for us, methinks) so paid a visit to Status Plus‘ fabulous showroom in Cairns on Saturday morning. Good timing too – they were hosting an outdoor broadcast with Zinc FM, there were cook-offs, demonstrations and much more. Big thanks to Shar’ron for all her knowledge and help during the morning. One such delight we discovered was this magic tap – the stream is blue when it’s cold, and red when … you guessed it, hot.

Beer o’clock (actually, we were waiting for Cooper’s mum who got lost among the Cairns shops – as you do), so we decided to take a quick pit stop at The Courthouse, sipping on $4 Coronas under the winter sunshine. .

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On Sunday, after a little morning clean up and walk with the dog, we took a drive to stunning Paradise Palms Resort & Country Club for a catch-up with some friends and family. Nice day for it too.

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There’s a beautiful under cover dining area, and Sunday was blissful here. We ate, drank and were merry.

Pp

Then? Time for a nap!

 

Top tour travel tips London and UK

Top tour travel tips London and UK

London Eye Sarah Blinco

Are you considering a tour such as the one I’ve just been on with Back Roads Touring in the UK? Cooper and I are fans of tours because put simply, if you’re short on time / on your own / not travelled much / don’t want the hassle of getting lost or stuck in dreadful accommodation, then generally with a tour you can’t go wrong. There are however, some important factors to remember if you’re embarking on a tour. Further to this, if you begin a tour in London but are a first-timer in the city, here are a few tips that may be of use…

Top tour travel tips London and UK

11 tips/preparing for a tour + first time in London:

  • How long will you be in London – is it worthwhile buying an Oyster (transport) Card? My rule of thumb is that if you’re going to be commuting in London for over three days then buy a ‘weekly pass’ – it’s MUCH cheaper than ‘topping up’ all the time and allows Tube and bus travel in all the areas you’re going to need. If travelling within the city for just a day or two, buy a ‘day pass’ each day, unless you literally are only planning one trip on the Tube for the day (unlikely).
  • Consider day tour options around the city – it’s huge with lots to see. The ‘big red bus’ hop-on-hop-off option is always a good one.
  • Be careful when commuting on buses and the Tube – while these services are efficient for familiar users, sometimes visitors will find the rush of busy passengers overwhelming and insensitive. Be aware that buses can pull off without warning.
  • PLAN what you want to see and where you want to go – Tower of London, Kensington Palace etc. Organise passes in advance. London is vast, and it can be arduous and tiring to navigate if you’re unfamiliar with the city.
  • Most pubs and cafes offer free WiFi, so if your hotel is charging through the roof for this service, chances are there is a free option within just a block or two of your location.
  • On tour, always be on time back to the coach – it is only fair on the driver/guide and fellow passengers, and it’s very stressful for everyone if people have to wait and/or come searching for you.
  • Never go anywhere / leave the coach without a credit card and your passport, as well as contact number(s) for your guide and other emergency contact details – just in case!
  • In the UK, Orange Mobile offers inexpensive pay-as-you-go SIM cards (easy to top up at any ATM) that can be utilised in most mobile phones, iPhones, and even iPad / tablet options. Orange or T-Mobile shops are all over London.
  • Don’t over-pack! Inevitably everyone who ends up with too many (large) bags admits they’ve brought too much, and it becomes painstaking trying to get from one place to another. Also, take clothes that you can mix, match and layer. It helps to bring clothes you can wash together too – you don’t want to be doing ‘separate loads’ on the go. If you’re stopping somewhere for two nights, do your washing as soon as you stop which leaves ample time for drying. Wrap washing in a towel and ring as much water out of it as you can, then hang washing around the room or on coat hangers. Jeans are serviceable, but can be quite heavy if you take too many.
  • Ask your tour guide where the nearest supermarket is, and buy your water in big bottles which is far cheaper.
  • If you see a person travelling on their own, include them in your outings. The more people you embrace, the better. You’ll also get more out of your trip by talking to and getting to know your co-travellers.

 

Travel with: Back Roads Touring UK and Escape Travel Australia

Do you have other tips to add? Please share them with us in the comments below 🙂

Personalised touring in the UK

Personalised touring in the UK

As those of you reading this blog will know, I’ve recently been on a journey through the ‘Heart of England’ with Back Roads Touring in the UK (organised via Escape Travel in Australia).

Back Roads Touring offers a wide range of options throughout the UK and Europe, and in fact I have my eye on several more trips in the UK that I’d love to book over the coming year or so (particularly the Corners of Cornwall 7-day, The Red Dragon of Wales 6-day, and Secrets of Southern England 4-day tours – take a look at the itineraries on the website and you’ll understand why). A few of our co-travellers had even booked two or three Back Roads Touring adventures in a row, with our Heart of England tour sitting in the middle of their holiday plans.

The Heart of England tour itself though is a classic choice, especially if you’re trying to decide on one particular option in the country. Four days was a nice length of time to be on a tour, there were no early morning starts and we generally had enough time to explore each destination. Best of all, this tour offers an overview of all that we’d typically associate with England – green countryside, old English pubs, castles, royalty, Shakespeare, medieval sites all the way through to mythological and mysterious destinations such as Stonehenge.

Evidently these tours are ideal for a person with a mature, intelligent and interested mindset who is a keen, (sometimes) seasoned traveller seeking a low-stress adventure, as well as quality, comfortable accommodation and up-market dining options.

With so many tour operators to choose from these days, why consider Back Roads Touring?

  • Small travel groups.
  • Mini bus means travelling through towns and seeing them (many large buses can’t go where Back Roads Touring can).
  • Quality dining options.
  • Personalised service including travel advice and assistance.
  • The opportunity to get to know everyone on board.
  • Relaxed travel experience.
  • Expert guides who introduce ‘local’ experiences at each tour stop.
  • Pleasant accommodation.
  • Aspirational destinations.
  • Back Roads Touring offers the discerning traveller the ultimate in exploration options based on over 25-years experience in the small group and tailor-made tour industry in this region.

For an overview on Back Roads Touring visit www.backroadstouring.co.uk or view the short video below.

 

My own trip highlights? This time around I’d definitely say Windsor Castle (vast, stunning, lavish, historical) and Stratford upon Avon (romantic… Shakespeare! Need I say more?). I was also impressed by the accommodation and delicious meals that were part of the ‘Back Roads Touring’ experience. 

Such stuff as dreams are made on – visit Stratford upon Avon

Such stuff as dreams are made on – visit Stratford upon Avon

I was looking forward to today’s visit to Stratford upon Avon. I haven’t seen all of England’s towns (wish I had) but I think I can safely say this is definitely one of the prettiest of them all. Obviously this medieval market town is particularly famous for one writer – William Shakespeare.

Stratford upon Avon boatsI’ll admit, I’m a fan. He’s influenced so much of our language and his stories continue to stand the test of time. I’m intrigued by the entire period he represents and so visiting Stratford upon Avon has always been part of my own ‘bucket list’ of places to see.

Today it’s my birthday – I’m an Anzac Day baby. Happy Birthday to me! It was a special day in Stratford upon Avon too, as April 25 marks the anniversary of Shakespeare’s funeral.

His birth home, Anne Hathaway’s cottage, Holy Trinity Church (where he’s buried) and various other monuments around the town showcased tributes and flowers to mark the occasion. Interestingly, William Shakespeare was born on April 23 – and he also died on April 23 (evidently in different years)! Weird – the thought did cross my mind today – is it sad, ironic or completely extraordinary that you’re born and die on the same day? Perhaps it just means you’re extra extra special, which he definitely was (and is).

Stratford upon Avon

Everyone in our group enjoyed Stratford upon Avon – apparently the second most visited place in England outside of London. It’s a delightful and interesting town where even if you’re ‘not into Shakespeare’, it’s impossible to not feel a little whimsical and romantic exploring the old streets and homes – all well maintained by diligent workers and fans of the Bard.

As part of the day’s adventures we visited Anne Hathaway’s enchanting cottage (pictured above). Steeped in history – if only the walls could talk.

Anne was William’s wife, and her family lived in this home for generations – up until 1911 in fact. Historical items in the home include beds (Anne’s parents’ bed as well as a bed that is thought to have been Anne and William’s ‘marriage bed’), kitchen and garden items.

Dscn0142_copyThe guide at the cottage, Alison, was SO knowledgeable and the visit was worthwhile for all her interesting facts and stories alone.

One thing I found incredibly entertaining was that she told us how in Tudor times, among much other baking, bread emerged from the oven burnt on the bottom (remember, no trays then); children under 11-years-old got the bottom bit first (they were ‘lowly’, like servants), next cut (or the ‘cut(s) above’) were distributed to the older children and so on; then the ‘upper crust(s)’ were given to the man of the house or distinguished guests. Hence class system connotations derived from a ‘simple’ process with a family loaf of bread – this, like so many other phrases coined from this period are still used to this day.

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Today we also passed through quaint, intriguing little villages like Mickleton – home of the Three Ways House – a pub that lays claim to the popular ‘pudding club’ – renowned the country over! We also explored the exquisite villages of Broadway and Snowshill and stopped by a worthwhile lookout point (where on a clear day you can see all the way to Wales), Dover Hill – named after a guy called Robert Dover who actually came up with the concept of the Cotswold Olympick Games which this year celebrates its 400th milestone and highlights important cultural sports like… shin kicking – see a video here!

This is the second tour I’ve been lucky enough to be a part of, and once again I’m struck by how lovely it is to get to know different people from various parts of the world whom I might otherwise never have crossed paths with. Over breakfast, lunch, on the bus and while sipping on an afternoon coffee – each conversation with co-adventurers – solo travellers, couples, friends, mother-daughter teams and siblings – reveals something new: a positive attitude, life challenge overcome, surprising secret skill, a helpful piece of advice… It’s really possible to make lovely friends and be inspired on trips like this, because the bond of exploration and new experience is shared by all. We’re lucky to have amazing organised journeys on offer to us now – I’m a huge advocate of these tours because as I’ve said before – it ends up being about the travel and the (new) friends.

 

VIEW THE PHOTOS HERE / and HERE.

WHERE: Stratford upon Avon, the Cotswolds.

HOW: Back Roads Touring UK and Escape Travel Australia.

DINED AT: Eight Bells Inn.

STAYED: Noel Arms Hotel, Chipping Campden