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Glamour cue (not saving your best for special occasions)

Glamour cue (not saving your best for special occasions)

A little learning on not saving your best for special occasions – find your glamour cue each and every day 👑

Not saving your best for special occasions: the story

Once upon a time I lived in tiny and expensive flat in a huge city overseas.

Competition for a roof over your head continues to be high in many places, and out of naïve fear I’d accepted the first unaffordable rental a real estate agent sold me on.

This apartment block housed a young, international set, mostly fortunate students who curiously didn’t work but had way more fun-funds than I did.

The experience wasn’t the homeliest I’ve had, and my pay packet stretched only as far as rent and a bit of food.

Trash, treasure and a splash of glamour

That’s why the communal corridor near the ‘bin room’ was such a treat.

You see, every time this transient crowd shifted in and out of the building, they’d leave unwanted goods in that space. Furniture, towels, blankets, cushions, kitchenware, shoes, lamps, kettles, storage boxes, trinkets and clothes would appear every few weeks. All in good condition, nearly-new! The little hallway offered a treasure trove of goodies that saved me loads of money.

One special day I was on my way to work when I spotted a fresh pile of pretty things left for the picking. Sure I needed to catch the train, like, ten minutes prior, however, I was captivated.

Unceremoniously dumped amongst a pile of women’s accessories, was a stylish black leather Kate Spade tote bag!

A Google search later indicated it would retail for more than (AU)$700. My bag’s former owner (someone with more money than sense) had abandoned it still full of her old gum wrappers, crumpled tissues, used cosmetics, and it was stained on the inside with what looked like leaked nail varnish. With a loving clean, it was nearly good as new.

Not saving your best for special occasions: living a glamorous life now

From that moment on, my Kate Spade tote and I were inseparable. I’d never owned an expensive bag before. I’m a fairly low-maintenance kinda girl, however carrying it around made me feel glamorous. It was just a bag that I’d retrieved from the trash, but it did add sparkle to my days.

Indeed, the word ‘glamour’ is derived from Scots (the old English language as spoken in Scotland), when in the early 1700s, the Scottish altered the English word ‘grammar’ to create ‘glamer’ or ‘glamour’, meaning ‘a magic spell’.

What is glamour?

Glamour. A little bit of magic, a feeling that things are in the flow and all eyes are on a sassy version of you. Enchanting, don’t you think?

More reasons to not be saving your best for special occasions, like weddings, formals, awards shows or a jaunt through Vienna.

Glamour can be accessed every day. My Kate Spade handbag made me realise that the spell is in the detail, if that detail is special to me. I still don’t seek designer gear, but I make sure that I implement touches of glamour in my life that serve as a cue to walk tall and approach my to-do list with grace and ease.

Glamour cue: be your happiest today

Your daily dose of glamour might mean ensuring your nails are manicured, wearing a fabulous hair accessory, getting fit and healthy, or brightening up your home with fresh flowers. Maybe the glamorous life to you, means the removal of excess, making space for calm, simplicity and the got-it-together confident you.

When the tragic news of designer Kate Spade’s death popped up as a notification on my phone in June, I recalled how the creation that bore her logo had brought me joy. That bag was my icon of glamour, the reminder to smile warmly, flick my hair a little, and to radiate the bright energy I intend to share with the world. Little had I known, I did not need a big budget or to be in attendance at a fancy event in order to ‘be’ glamorous.

In a reflection on the meaning of glamour, Financial Times journalist Susie Boyt says that, “your best self is not about pampering, but working on that song-in-your-heart mood”. How charming, and true. Find your glamour cues this month, and access daily, because a reality we can all agree on, is that life’s too short to save our best things for ‘special occasions’.

 

Read the latest issue of Get it Magazine, getit-magazine.com.au
Why does media focus on the negative?

Why does media focus on the negative?

Why’s the media got to be so mean?

I love media, more than most – it’s my life! But, I’ve never understood the obsession with doing anything to get the story or choosing to report the negative rather than the positive. Spend any time in the UK and you’ll see this is particularly prevalent – the meaner the headline, the more negative or nasty the story, the better. It’s certainly not much different anywhere else in the world. But why? Is it really human nature to want to bring people down this much? Some would argue yes, that’s what sells papers, therefore that’s why journalists are taught and encouraged to angle a story this way.

Why does media focus on the negative?

Taylor Swift Red BrisbaneCase in point, I was lucky enough to attend Taylor Swift’s sensational show at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane on Saturday night, with 40,000 other revellers. She was just gorgeous, and the production excellent. I understand why this young artist is selling out stadiums around the world. If you can look up to someone who is younger than you, then I definitely look up to her. She’s nice, confident without being arrogant, and she writes beautiful music. It was also lovely to see that talent which is non-offensive, naked and twerking its way around the world is appreciated on a great scale by an audience of all ages. For a moment in the show, there was a bit of a malfunction, which did impact on a few attendees at the front. The majority of the massive crowd had no idea, and as the crew fixed up what turned out to be a damaged elevated stage, Taylor came out and amused the crowd for a few moments. Anyone severely put out evidently had their money refunded. In any case, these things happen, and it was rectified swiftly (pun intended) and efficiently. However, next evening on the news, channel 9 in Australia didn’t report on the wonderful show, or the excited crowd, or the brilliant performer behind it all – instead they produced a full segment on the “dramatic chaos” that unfolded, and even went to the bother of tracking down one of the very few audience members who needed to be moved. Why would they choose for this to be the focus of the story when in reality, thousands of people gained so much enjoyment from the evening? A song Taylor sang during the Red concert was Mean from her last album, and I have to say, I reckon it’s applicable to this news piece. The reason I’m blogging about it is because I noticed other attendees saw this TV news piece and commented on social media, agreeing with my own sentiments recorded here.

This is one timely example relevant to my world, but it happens by the minute across all news outlets. Why does media focus on the negative? I would like to suggest though, that there is a vast audience who isn’t interested in this negative angle anymore, and I think this point is proven by the popularity blogs, websites, and magazines like Psychologies or Mind Food which present positive, useful, informative and helpful features and news. Perhaps it is also proven by the falling sales of newspapers and declining TV news ratings? We don’t all want to hear about the “chaos”, “dramatic event” or “disaster” that probably didn’t even happen in the first place. And if you’re going to report it, perhaps this doesn’t need to be 100% of the story – maybe, just maybe, you could report on one aspect that an audience would smile at or be happy about. If nothing else, it would help change the world’s mindset that generally the daily news is bad or depressing, as (within reason, obviously) I don’t believe it is or has to be.

What are your thoughts? Why does media focus on the negative? Do you enjoy that aspect, or could you do without it within every news story (particularly those where this needn’t be the angle)? Join the conversation on FACEBOOK or TWITTER.

5 easy ways for writers to source media story leads and opportunities

5 easy ways for writers to source media story leads and opportunities

Are you a writer, journalist or blogger? If you answered ‘yes’, you’ll appreciate the issue of discovering leads, case studies, sources and opportunities. Here’s a fast guide to five top sites that might just help you this week …

 

1. NEWSMODO / Tweet @newsmodo_com

Here publishers send out briefs to freelancers, indicating whether they need story leads or photographs.

It’s a good one to be signed up to as many of the media utilising this service have dollars to spend on your worthy leads, pitches and ideas.

 

2. SOURCE BOTTLE / Tweet @sourcebottle

This one has been a favourite in the southern hemisphere for a while, but its reach is now worldwide.

Essentially, SourceBottle connects expert sources with journalists and bloggers who are after case studies or quotes for stories.

 

3.  RESPONSE SOURCE / Tweet @ResponseSource and @DWPub

ResponseSource is like the UK’s version of SourceBottle, and gives journalists, broadcasters and bloggers fast access to reliable stories, experts, information and case studies.

 

4.  HELP A REPORTER OUT / Tweet @helpareporter

Another of the world’s top ‘lead’ sites, although this one is essentially American-based.

As a writer, you’ll receive emails outlining what media are looking for – sources, pitches, case studies, information – and if you can ‘help them out’, you have the opportunity to respond.

A great resource on how to use HAR is published here

 

5. SOCIAL CALLOUT / Tweet @SocialCallout

A relatively new digital service linking brands to bloggers. As a blogger, you’ll receive notes on which brands are looking for digital/social support, and if your space fits the criteria, you can apply for the opportunity advertised.

 

Want more like this, or do you have any other tips and helpful sites to share? Connect now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER.

 

Enjoy your week, Sarah x

 

 

Get it Magazine cover shoot with Seeing Eye Dogs Australia

Get it Magazine cover shoot with Seeing Eye Dogs Australia

I’m so lucky to edit one of Australia’s coolest and most beautiful city lifestyle magazines, Get it, and am proud of the creative team who have outdone themselves this month. Check out the gorgeous cover and fashion shoot behind-the-scenes video featuring Seeing Eye Dogs Australia …

[vimeo id=”66147621″]

 

Want more? You’ll find Get it Magazine on Facebook and Twitter,

and come play with me over at Travel Live Learn on Facebook, and on Twitter @sarahblinco  x

 

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