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11 hacks for travelling with a dog

11 hacks for travelling with a dog

At one point or another, you may end up travelling with a dog (aka your best mate!). You don’t have to have trepidation about it as it can actually prove to be a great time for both you and your pooch.

In order to make things easier while you are travelling with a dog, you should utilise the following 11 travel hacks below 🥰

 

1. When travelling with a dog, bring a dryer sheet

Many dogs tend to get very nervous when it’s thundering and lightening outside. They often get scared because of static electricity builds up in their fur.

You can use a dryer sheet to calm them down.

Simply rub it over their fur to get rid of static electricity buildup. It’s a quick and easy way to calm them down when it’s stormy outside.

 

2. Book travel based on your dog’s schedule

It’s imperative that you book your travel at the right time. You don’t want to be taking off on a flight or starting a long car ride during the time of day when your dog has the most energy. This is why you should book your travel based on your dog’s schedule.

Try to make your travel plans for when you know he will be tired and want to nap. While there’s no guarantee that he will actually sleep, your travels will go a whole lot easier if he snoozes for at least part of it.

👉If your schedules don’t match up, have you considered engaging a pet and house sitter? Find out more

 

3. Pack a squeegee when travelling with a dog

Squeegees aren’t just for cleaning car windows. They can actually be very beneficial at cleaning up dog hair. You can use it to get up hair on carpets, furniture or beds.

 

4. Get the contact information for vets at your destination

Unfortunately, dogs can get sick or become injured when you are travelling. Because of this, you need to know where the nearest vet is. You don’t want to wait until there’s an emergency in order to find a vet.

Research vets at your destination beforehand. Reach out to them to make sure that they are taking new patients.

If they are, keep their contact information handy just in case you need it while you are at your destination.

how to travel with a dog

 

5. Strategise so that they’ll need to relieve themselves less on travel days

You probably don’t want to stop constantly so that your dog can relieve himself. Fortunately, there are some things that you can do so that he will need to go potty less.

Don’t feed him or give him water right before you walk out of the door. You may want to feed him or give him water so that he’s not hungry or thirsty, but he will just need to relieve himself at an inopportune time.

Try giving him something to eat or drink about an hour before you walk out of the door.

 

6. Use a pet carrier that has wheels

Carrying your dog around over long periods of time can be difficult. You can make it easier on yourself by getting a pet carrier that has wheels. This will allow you to safely navigate your way around a crowded airport without putting your dog’s safety in jeopardy. Just make sure that he is used to it well ahead of travel time.

Do a few practice runs in the weeks leading up to your vacation. In order to make it easier for him or her, put a favourite toy or blankets in it as well.

 

7. Bring an indoor potty system

There may be times where you can’t take your dog outside to relieve himself. This is where an indoor potty system can come in handy.

You can use it when your dog gets sick and needs somewhere to go pretty quickly. It also might be forbidden to let your dog relieve himself outside of your holiday destination, or you might find that it’s very rainy out and isn’t safe to take him outside.

No matter what the reason may be, he can use the indoor potty system to relieve himself. You won’t have to deal with accidents because there wasn’t a place to take him to do so.

 

8. Pack baking soda

Even dogs that have been potty trained for a long time can have accidents while travelling.

If your dog pees on a carpet, you can easily clean this up with a bit of baking soda. All you need to do is sprinkle it over the wet spot. In a few minutes it will absorb all of the urine.

 

9. Portion their food beforehand

You want to make sure that you pack the right amount of food for your dog. One way to do this is by portioning it before you travel.

Pack a day’s worth of food in a sealable bag. This will ensure that your dog gets the right amount of food, and you won’t have to travel with dog food that you won’t end up using.

travelling with a dog

 

10. Have an extra collar and leash

One of the most misplaced items when travelling is a collar or leash. This is why you need to have an extra of both. You don’t want to let your dog run around without a leash or collar, and there might not be a retailer near your hotel where you can purchase one.

 

11. Pack a can of chicken broth

Dogs can easily get upset tummies when they are travelling. If your dog just has a little bit of motion sickness, you don’t necessarily have to run to the vet.

Chicken broth can help soothe their stomach.

Place a little bit of it in his/her water to drink. Chicken broth is packed with nutrients, and it can make him feel better pretty quickly. Just make sure that you choose a chicken broth that’s low in sodium as too much salt isn’t good for dogs.

Travelling with your dog can prove to be a very enjoyable time for the both of you. If you will be travelling with your dog soon, make sure you utilise some of the travel hacks mentioned above. By doing so, you will ensure that both you and your dog have a great time no matter where in the world you go.

 

Got questions or other tips? Let us know in the comments.

Can’t take your pooch with you on holidays? Have a read about other options so they’re well cared for while you’re away 💕

 

 

Pet hotel and 4 other options for your dog when you travel

Pet hotel and 4 other options for your dog when you travel

The school holidays are fast approaching and no doubt you’re already planning a trip with the family – but this begs the question: pet hotel, or what else to do with the fur child?

Cooper and I have had dogs most of our lives. We know that they all have different personalities and cope in varying ways outside of our company. Also, we learnt lessons from the years spent as younger, less experienced dog owners, on what is good or not so good for pets when we are absent.

Pet hotel, in home sitting or take them with you? Questions to ask yourself about your pooch:

  1. Does my dog have problems with unfamiliar people or surroundings?
  2. Does my dog get along well with other dogs?
  3. How long is reasonable to leave my dog at home on his/her own for (keeping in mind, they are social creatures)?
  4. How much exercise does my dog need, even if we’re travelling/on holidays?

The answers to these questions take you some way to deciding on what you need to arrange for your four-legged friend(s) when planning your own break away.

Pet hotel and dog-friendly accommodation: can you take your dog with you?

Of course, one option is to take your pooch with you and this requires a lot of planning. 02 dog and kidsThe main things to keep in mind are to book dog friendly accommodation and to choose a travel destination that best fits your dog’s breed. It might not be ideal to go hiking with a dachshund, for example. But a hotel that allows dogs (dog hotel) is perfect.

You also have to think about if you will travel by car or plane (and the high costs of the latter). Both in the car and on a plane, the dog should be in a dog crate. It will take time for your dog to get used to staying in a crate over an extended period of time, which means you have to train him/her before you go on a holiday. Travelling can mean a lot of stress for your pooch if it’s not facilitated in the right way.

Boarding kennels

Not everything that is expensive is the best option. A boarding kennel is one of the most expensive and usually least ideal options to consider (I personally have had both wonderful and terrible experiences, and it truly depends on whether the establishment is run by genuine, caring ‘dog people’ or not).

Your dog is in an unfamiliar environment with unfamiliar people and won’t get a lot of individual attention, because the sitter-to-dog ratio can be as low as 1:100. The dogs often sleep and stay in small cages. A positive however, is that your dog has a lot of friends to play with when in the running yard (assuming there is one – which there should be).

Friends and family

This might be the best and most trustworthy option (shout out to our family in Cairns – you know who you are). 03 dog and teddyYour dog is already familiar with the people and surroundings, this means less stress when you’re away.

If your dog stays with friends or family, make sure they have their favourite toy and/or dog bed. We’d also leave something that smelled like us (eg. an old t-shirt). It only makes sense that your dog stays there if your friend or family member is at home often enough to take care of the pooch and has fun doing it.

Your dog can also stay at your home and someone comes to feed and walk him/her every day, but keep in mind that dogs can break things, tip over their water bowl, get hurt or very anxious if left alone for extended periods of time.

In-home dog sitting

When your dog feels uncomfortable being in unfamiliar surroundings for a long period of time this is a good option, as long as it’s something you are happy with too.

A dog sitter will come and live in your house for the time you’re on holiday. There are many options advertised in local newspapers and online, but you’ll want to be satisfied with references before leaving someone the keys to your home.

Must read: our experience being dog-sitters in London

 

Dog sitting at the minder’s home

A great alternative for dogs that need that extra level of TLC, and easy to find thanks to the internet. Dog sitters are mostly passionate ‘dog people’ who currently own a dog, or who have had a dog in the past but cannot make the long-term commitment.

As you can meet the minder prior to committing, you’ll have the peace of mind in knowing your dog is in good hands. There’s plenty of services we are aware of, like Borrow My Doggy in the UK, or FindADogMinder.com.au in Australia, where you can even choose the kind of property your prefer for your pooch to hang out at, and all minders are insured and screened too.

Do you have tips, thoughts or suggestions on caring for dogs while you’re on holidays? We’re passionate dog people so would love to hear from you… leave a note in the comments below. 

 

Information shared with us via findadogminder.com.au