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In home pet boarding: sitter’s guide to dog care

In home pet boarding: sitter’s guide to dog care

Give your dog the best life when you go on a holiday – in home pet boarding is so easy! Following is a guide to how a sitter will take care of all of your dog’s needs, and how you can make this happen in time for your next travel trip.

In home pet boarding – what is it?

Cooper and I are currently on a ‘slow travel’ trip around the UK and Europe. We started house and dog sitting in London. Those city sits were short sits, and now we’re on a journey of a series of long sits that started in Northampton, have taken us to Ireland and soon France and Malta. You’ll see from our content that we are big dog people. The same goes for most of those signed up to a reputable in home pet boarding service like TrustedHousesitters.

If you can’t travel with your pooch to a pet hotel or utilise any other pet care travel options, a house sitting service may be for you.

In home pet boarding means that your pets can stay in their own environment while you’re away. Research shows this is far better for their wellbeing and state of mind. And, there’s no shortage of ‘animal people’ who are happy to visit your place, stay and take care of the fur babies.

It’s cheaper than you might think too. Most sites charge a fee per year which allows for background checks on home owners and sitters, and for the running of a site that helps us find good matches.

 

Special needs? No worries

Over the past few months we’ve learnt a LOT about different dogs and their needs. We’ll admit, we have been a bit surprised by the range of personalities we’ve met.

 

 

It’s been such a great experience to meet home owners and facilitate in home pet boarding for gorgeous dogs. We’ve got some insights to share, to show how seriously pet sitters take our jobs.

The range of needs taken care of by us as house and pet sit includes:

Anxiety

Many poor little dogs have anxiety. This may present through persistent barking (no, they’re not necessarily just being naughty!), fearful behaviours like retreating or tail between the legs.

We’ve experienced a range of dog anxiety, and it’s important that pet owners and sitters communicate any known needs or concerns. As our experience grows, we understand it’s really important to nurture dogs like kids. Reward them for good behaviour, and don’t write off defensive behaviour (like barking at another dog) automatically as a dog misbehaving. Sometimes it’s a protection mechanism. We take treats on walks with us and do whatever we can to ensure our dogs feel loved and safe.

Diets

Cooper and I understand it’s very important to respect the requests of pet owners, especially when it comes to their diet. Many pups are on a diet for their own health reasons. This may mean eating certain foods at a particular time of the day. We always abide by this, for the wellbeing of our fur babies.

Again, communication is critical. As a pet owner, write instructions down but discuss face to face if possible.

Medication

Another really important one. A fave pup of ours in the Cotswolds has been through a hip operation and has a heart murmur. He’s on specific medication three times a day. His mum was very helpful and thorough, sorting his medication into pill containers and also leaving us instructions and talking us through it.

As a sitter, we should be prepared to administer medication. We are experienced with dogs including our own, and know the drill, so we get on with it. You should be able to rely on your sitter to take good care of your pets, even if medication is required. We have a duty of care to them. (and it’s all totally fine by us)

Age (and associated abilities or health care requirements)

Cooper and I have had one instance where we looked after an old gentleman who suffered severe separation anxiety. This is normal for older dogs, although it was distressing to see him so upset.

Our strategy involved giving him ample time to himself, making sure he was eating and sleeping, and taking him out for walks when he got used to us. We did actually call the TrustedHousesitters advice line to ensure we were doing all the right things, which we were. Sometimes there’s no way around a dog being apprehensive. But, we know to give him/her space and still be around so they’re not alone. Of course, if sickness, trembling, no sleep or no eating kicks in, it’s time to contact the vet or emergency details left by the home owner.

In this instance, our little man’s parents were aware of his anxiety and had already taken him to the vet about it. They had also warned us he might struggle. We stayed in constant contact with them to keep them updated, and after a few days he did settle with us.

As far as other age-related issues go, always discuss how far a dog can or wants to walk each day, and what their overall abilities are like – how is their hearing or sight, for example?

 

Exercise and rehab

The same little man we took care of who needs his meds three times a day also needs rehab for his hip. This was a really rewarding experience for Cooper and I. The doggie’s mum went through five sets of exercises we needed to do with him, including a circuit in his back yard, leg lifts (like shaking his paw), and balancing activities.

This dog was so good and so diligent and we happily obliged.

Routine

They say routine is just as important for dogs as it is kids, and we’d agree (especially Cooper, a teacher by trade). Leave thorough instructions for your sitter as to what your pet’s routine is. If possible, chat through in person. Usually the dogs tell us when it’s time for their walk or dinner! But, it’s good to know what their usual day looks like, so it can be continued while their family is away.

Sight or hearing loss

Ok, so some pups have ‘selective’ hearing loss, we know that well! But others, particularly ageing dogs, start to lose some of their sight and hearing. This can lead to anxiety, or fright if they don’t know we’re around.

We have learnt to make sure we make noise or vibrations on the floor so as not to startle a pooch whose hearing is going. Similarly, we will ensure they see us properly. It can be hard enough with their parents gone – we make every effort to help them through and accommodate any special needs.

‘Personality differences’ between dogs

This is a classic that you’re likely to see on the street. Some dogs, like people, just don’t get along. Always make sure that any personality quirks are discussed between sitters and pet owners. One of our pup’s parent’s gave us a heads-up that their cute dog wouldn’t be behind the door at getting into a bit of an argument with others. They were right 😂 But we knew, and managed it. Again, communication and being up front about your dog’s personality is key, for their own wellbeing and bespoke care a sitter can offer.

 

As a home owner or pet sitter, do you have questions or tips to add? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below. 

 

 

House sitting Ireland: 3 things you need to know

House sitting Ireland: 3 things you need to know

We’ve just come back to England after our house sitting Ireland assignment through TrustedHousesitters – what an experience! So far on this house sitting and pet sitting adventure we’ve met the loveliest people. From London to Northampton and then Balbriggan just outside of Dublin. It’s been refreshing, rediscovering the best in humanity.

Not to mention, we’re learning so much about places we’d never have even known to go to. Funnily enough, Northampton is known for its shoe industry. We then went to Balbriggan to house sit in Ireland, and this town’s famous for making hosiery! So famous, in fact, that this gorg seaside spot used to serve all the royals in Europe, including the Empress of Austria, the Czarina of Russia and Queen Victoria herself. A little on the history here.

house sitting in Ireland you can't miss Dublin

 

Out and about: house sitting Ireland

In Ireland we house sat for Harley the Tibetan terrier, and his parents. We crossed with Harley’s humans right before they went on a two week trip to France (the reason we were house sitting in Ireland) and for a night when they came back. We had such a great time with them, leaving as friends. When they came back, we had gone to some effort to ensure the house was sparkling clean and that we had a meal ready for them. Part of showing gratitude.

Find out more about those tips:

 

Harley himself was a super quirky, cool, unique dog. We’re discovering a whole new world of personalities doing this.

Our love of dogs and experience with different breeds has been coming in handy, we apply it to a new situation everywhere we land. New things we’re discovering, especially with older dogs, is separation anxiety and also a stubbornness when they’re independently minded. Me and them get along famously 😂 [jokes]

House sitting Ireland - Harley the dog

 

Get yourself to Ireland

Ireland is famous the world over for being beautiful and the people are well-known for being funny, hospitable and kind. We can absolutely vouch for all of this.

It’s pretty easy to get started – sign up for a site like TrustedHousesitters. Get your profile and reference checks sorted, and then the fun begins.

If you’re looking for house sitting Ireland opportunities, set up alerts for the country, and keep an eye out for new listings every day. We’ve found that the sites can be competitive, so you want to be within the first few people to apply.

 

House sitting Ireland: top tips

Getting around

Ireland is not a huge country, so it’s possible to be able to plan seeing a bit of it around your house sitting assignments. There’s internal flights to main cities, and trains too. But once you get into the heart of Ireland you’ll probably need a car.

That said, we’ve not hired one yet. In Dublin the transport is quite good and you can walk a lot of places. We caught local buses to our pet sit/ house sit in Balbriggan which is an hour outside of Dublin. Our sit home owners got all the details on this to us prior to us confirming the sit – important, to make sure you’re right to commit. We needed to make sure we wouldn’t be so remote so as not to be able to get groceries and living essentials.

 

Leave time to explore

There’s so many beautiful places to go in Ireland. We’ve been lucky enough to explore Dublin, and further south around Killarney. Have a read of our guides (linked) and watch our videos for more information.

Ireland is brimming with experiences though. You can drive along the coast and discover all the little towns and ports, and go inland to meet more of the country’s characters. It’s possible to do it within two or three weeks. But we love spending time somewhere if we’ve got it.

 

Double check:

It’s important to check the dates you’re due to arrive (does your house sit need you a day earlier than advertised?). And what’s your plan on the other side? How will you get to your next destination? Do you need an extra night’s accommodation?

We’ve found home owners to be so lovely and helpful, which we really appreciate. At the moment we’re travelling and transport-less. Keep the lines of communication open and make your plans ahead of time.

Enjoy house sitting in Ireland!

Let us know in the comments if you have any other tips or questions. We’ve also got a whole series of videos on YouTube with advice on house and pet sitting. Subscribe and find them here.

 

4 types of house sitting jobs UK (and how to get them)

4 types of house sitting jobs UK (and how to get them)

We recently posted about becoming house and pet sitters in London using TrustedHousesitters. Because we’re expanding this beyond London only, we’ve been asked about house sitting jobs UK and how to secure them.

There’s four main types of house sitting jobs in the UK that might be suitable for you, depending on whether you want to travel, stay locally and take care of animals or not.

 

House sitting jobs UK

Local stays

No matter where you live in the UK, there are house sits nearby. We were based in London when we first decided to sign up to TrustedHousesitters, with a view to using the service for long-term travel. The site makes use of reviews, which help home and pet owners make a decision on who sits for them.

Being new users, we applied for local house sits in London. This gave us experience and the chance to build our reviews.

Plus, sitting locally offers a change of scenery and makes it possible to explore new neighbourhoods. Win/win!

If you’re on TrustedHousesitters, you can set up an alert with your availability and preferred location, and apply as new sits are published. Often home owners prefer someone who lives locally, believing them to be more reliable than someone who may be travelling through.

Short term

There’s plenty of short term house and pet sitting opportunities available in the UK. This is especially true if you’re around during key holiday times, like Easter, summer (August/September) and Christmas. By short term, we mean about two weeks.

Applying for a short term house sit in the UK means you can take a trip to a different part of the country and not have to worry about accommodation. This is a cost-effective way to travel.

Keep an eye out for daily alerts from TrustedHousesitters and apply for dates and locations that appeal to you as soon as you spot them.

Tip: if a sit already has over ten applicants, feel free to put your hand up for it. But, why not take it as a sign and apply for somewhere else instead? Go with the flow and be open to new experiences and destinations.

4 types of house sitting jobs UK (and how to get them)

 

Long term

We consider long term to be over two weeks. There are house and pet sits in the UK (and beyond, of course – house sitting Ireland is on our itinerary) that range anywhere from two weeks to a month, two months and even six months. Over the next few months, Cooper and I plan to ‘slow travel’ and explore the digital nomad lifestyle. We want to take our time in destinations. With that in mind, we specifically applied for longer term sits.

For us, long term sits are an excellent opportunity to ‘live’ somewhere new, and we can get into a routine for working and setting up our digital business. It’s also more cost-effective for us to stay in one place for two to four weeks.

There’s a wide range of sits in the UK, from country to city house sits, some that require a car, and others where you’re fine to walk everywhere (our preference). Our first long stay UK sit was in Northampton, which was ideal for our needs.

Before you commit to a long term sit, make sure you’re comfortable that all the facilities at the sit fit your needs, along with transport being appropriate for you, and that you have supermarkets or other preferred amenities around. You should also be certain that you will happily stay there for that long. Outside of an actual family emergency like a death in the family, you should never back out of a sit you’ve committed to because that majorly upsets the plans of the people you’ve agreed to sit for.

With animals or without

The best part of TrustedHousesitters for us is the opportunity to travel and take care of dogs. We LOVE dogs and are happy to spend all our time with our little charges, ensuring they’re as happy with us as they are with their own family.

If you’re using TrustedHousesitters, or any similar sites, you can filter searches by animal, to look for cat sits, horse sits, reptile sits… the list is endless. You can also opt to sit without any animals.

Only ever commit to a sit that you have experience for or that you’re willing to give a loving go to, especially if animals are involved.

 

 

Our experience so far has been that anyone using a service like TrustedHousesitters has the same attitude as us: they’re loving animal people, kind and open to meeting new friends from all walks of life.

Hopefully this has inspired you to get out and travel, whether it’s in your own backyard, or further afield. Comments and questions always appreciated – drop us a line below.

Cooper and I have signed up to TrustedHousesitters – click the link if you’d like to know more or join the service too.

Are you a house and/or pet sitter? Come and join our special Facebook group 😃

 

 

 

 

This post contains affiliate links. More information on paid advertising on websites can be found here.

 

Walking: easy wellbeing for self employed

Walking: easy wellbeing for self employed

Working, travelling, and staying fit: how to manage wellbeing for self employed? It is possible, but you need to be mindful about it.

For digital nomads with wanderlust in their veins, health sometimes takes the backseat as we try to wrangle our lifestyle and stay on top of career goals. There’s constant challenges – where to stay and work, and how to make money!

Wellbeing for self employed: the simple trick

Being exposed to different climates and environments can take its toll if we aren’t careful. Wellbeing for self employed and digital nomads means keeping fit. But, this can be hard because we usually don’t stick to one place long enough to invest in a gym membership.

What can we do if we want a toned, healthy body that we’re proud of?

It’s simple, we can walk.

Wellbeing for self employed in a city means taking a break for a half hour stroll

Walking burns a ton of calories

According to Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, we need least 150 minutes of aerobic exercise each week. If you break this up into small chunks, it means you can exercise for 30 minutes five times a week and get the full benefits. But you need moderate to high-intensity kind of aerobics to pull it off.

Walking offers just the kind of cardio you need — easy to do, and even easier to modify depending on your time and level of physical fitness. If you keep a leisurely pace, you can burn around 70 calories per mile. The more you increase your speed, the more you can burn. If you walk at a brisk pace, you can burn anywhere from 300-400 calories an hour.



Here’s a calculator that can help you count the calories. If you want more accurate results, you can always use a pedometer or a Fitbit bracelet that will measure everything.

If you’re quite out of shape right now, walking is a great idea because it allows you to start things at your own pace. You can then slowly increase intensity as you grow stronger and get more stamina. You might even be forced into walking as you globe-trot if you choose a style of travel like house and pet sitting.

Walking has a lot of health benefits

Walking doesn’t just burn calories, it also speeds up your metabolism. Even your passive metabolic rate can rise. This means that when you’re resting, you’re still using more energy than before, and your body starts melting fat quicker.

Regular walks are also great for improving your cardiovascular health and your immune system, and helping your overall muscle tone. Your leg, lower back, and core muscles will particularly benefit from this type of exercise.

Wellbeing for self employed and digital nomads is really important - get outside for a daily hike or walk wherever you are in the world

Hiking destinations are perfect for digital nomads

Want a surefire way to make yourself stick to an exercise regimen and finally get in shape? Take a hiking trip.

For a digital nomad, this can be a great experience that provides the perfect opportunity to blog about something extremely interesting. It also means you’re taking a big step for your health and you won’t be making any more excuses.

There are plenty of options to choose from, like the short and fun Inca Trail, to the memorable Camino de Santiago that can take up to a month to finish. The Camino is renowned for being a deeply transformative experience that lets you experience Spain the way you never have before. It’s very good for people who plan to work the entire time because you’ll generally have internet access for most of the hike.

Other good options would be The King’s Trail in Sweden, the Yosemite Grand Traverse in California, and the Bay of Fires in Australia. If you want a huge challenge, then take the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine in the United States. It’s one of the longest and most beautiful of routes, but it’s difficult and it can take half a year to finish.

Not a fan of hiking? No worries…

If you really aren’t a fan of hiking, city breaks are the next best alternative. Sightseeing often means you have to cover a lot of ground on foot. Since you are too busy looking at said sights, you will not even notice how many miles you are covering.

Some of the best cities to walk in include Prague and its magnificent castles, and Boston with its historic routes. Also, you’ll want to get lost in Paris and its endlessly charming streets, then there’s Venice where walking might be the only option, but you wouldn’t want it any other way.

Walking is great if you find exercise boring

If the main reason you’re not in good shape is that you find the whole idea of exercise kind of dull, then walking is a great choice for you.

Why?

It’s easy to multitask as you stroll. Put headphones on and listen to your favourite soundtrack, audiobook, or podcast, or take your camera with you and get some work done for your blog. You can take some stunning photos while you explore the city you’re currently in.

This option is perfect for a digital nomad or the self-employed who need unique and interesting ways to capture a journey, whether it’s in your backyard or further afield.

How to manage your time

Same as always, do it by setting a goal.

If your life is too hectic, organising a specific time when you can go and take a walk each day can help immensely. If you want, you can use a walking exercise as a rest from work. Determine a schedule that lets you work a few hours non-stop, but then take a half an hour hike to clear your head, get your focus back, and get inspired again.

Enjoy the ease of walking! This simple aerobic exercise can help you get in shape, and if you’re a digital nomad who craves to be inspired, it also offers you the opportunity to further indulge your wanderlust by exploring every destination on foot.

 

About the author:

Rebecca Brown is a translator by day, and a traveller mostly at night. She is an expert on living with jet lag – and packing in tiny suitcases. You can read more of her exploits at RoughDraft.

 

House sitting London guide – how to: house and pet sitting

House sitting London guide – how to: house and pet sitting

As I write, I’m house sitting in London. I’m in the loveliest of places we could never afford in the north of the city. A few minutes up the road is Alexandra Palace!

I’m gazing upon the prettiest of gardens that you’d not imagine to be in central London. Rain is coming down hard outside, and all is quiet. Well, except for Alexa pumping out choice House tunes, perfect for a Friday after lunch.

There’s a sleeping dog next to me. His name is Blue, and he’s a short-haired lurcher. Blue’s family are on the other side of the country for a special wedding, and chose us for their London house and dog sit this weekend.

House sitting London: how did we get here?

Let’s rewind to the beginning of the year for a bit of context. Cooper and I decided to pursue a different direction which you’ll be reading a lot about from August 2019. Some hints were given on the blog when we started posting about digital nomad tips and tricks.

In fact, we are taking off on an epic nomad, dog-loving adventure – house and pet sitting across the UK and Europe while we work on this blog and other freelance projects.

We joined TrustedHousesitters, which requires its users to have reviews based on things like reliability and trustworthiness. (We’ll share more about these house sitting services in future posts.)

In order to increase our reviews before we travel long-term, we chose to apply for house sitting London gigs.

we love travel and dogs that why dog sitting is perfect for us

House sitting in London (that is, locally to where we live), meant we could:

  1. improve our rating on the house sitting service for London and beyond, and increase our chances of being chosen for sits
  2. gain more house sitting experience that we can take on the road
  3. spend time with dogs (most importantly!) 💛

In March our house sitting London journey began. I meant to write more about it because it’s not so much the places we stay that’s appealing, but the dogs we meet. Time has escaped me up until now. Still, better late than never 🐕

Dog sitting: the best part about house sitting!

We chose to embark upon this new style of travel, starting with our house sitting London experience, because it is certainly a cost-effective way of securing accommodation.

But the bonus for us – if not the driving motivator – is the fact we get to spend time with dogs 💕 I say to people that we’re turning from ‘crazy dog people’ into ‘craziER dog people’. We’re totally going to own it.

For dog-lovers, this lifestyle is the ultimate, especially if you’re not in a position to have a dog yourself, and you’re keen to travel as we are.

House and dog sitting has given us the chance to experience different types of dogs and their personalities.

 

For the love of dogs

Our first dog sit

Our ‘first’ were Polly and Darcy, two cheeky Westies. Darcy is an old soul and a gentleman of 11 years young. Polly is two years old, and the ring-leader in all things barking and chasing. Gosh we loved them. We’re heading back for a second sit for these little pooches soon which is pawesome.

This pair have such funny characteristics – one being the race out to the backyard every couple of hours to ‘check for a fox’ (that was there once). Polly will rouse Darcy from slumber to pursue this task, and next thing their little paws are racing along the wooden floor boards and the dance at the back door begins until Cooper or I let them outside.

They were great off the lead at the parklands up the road, and showed me that most dogs are happy to come back even if they’re not yours!

During TV time, we were surprised to learn the lengths of their affection, as Darcy jumped up onto the sofa and then up again onto the back of it, to sit leaning into our shoulders. Polly would make herself comfortable between Cooper and I on the couch. One big happy (temporary) family. 😂

It was sad to leave them, if I’m honest.

 

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Catering to unique needs

But then came George and Milly. Yes, we fell in love with these two as well, but for different reasons. George is an old soul who certainly still loves adventures but his back legs have had enough and so Cooper learnt to walk George on a harness. We’d take he and his younger adopted mate, Milly, over to beautiful Hampstead Heath for a walk around the path that they’re familiar with. People would stop to make way for George, and the dog-lovers would give us a smile as if to say, ‘how lovely, bless his little cottons socks’.

Milly had a tough time when she was a baby, being mistreated by her original owners. Don’t get us started. She won the lottery with the mums she ended up with though, two inspiring women who it was an absolute privilege to meet!

This sit helped us grow as dog carers. When Milly and George’s parents left for their travels, there was an hour or two where we needed to get acquainted. Usually we’d take a dog on a walk to help them settle with us as new humans in their space. I was on my own for the first few hours of this sit and couldn’t walk George. It was Milly, George and me, sussing each other out. Milly seemed a little anxious without her mums, and I was a bit anxious worrying that the dogs seemed worried.

Cooper arrived though, we went on an adventure to the park, had some food and everyone settled. By the end of this weekend sit, we got an understanding of George’s barks and sounds telling us what he wanted. Milly would demand to be massaged on her head by pawing our legs and insisting we ‘continue’. How amazing to communicate with dogs like this.

getting to know dogs is a bonus of housesitting and pet sitting

Anxiety, walks and weather

Now I’m with Blue, waiting for Cooper to get in from his day at work. Blue was super happy to welcome me into his home. However, about an hour into the sit, he disappeared. I thought I’d lost him! He was hiding in the laundry room in the dark.

Fortunately I figured out it wasn’t due to me, but rather, his mum had said he is fearful of storms. There was one overhead, so we waited it out together. Blue isn’t fond of rain, or the heat, but I discovered Blue likes hugs and treats, which will do us until things are better outside and we can find adventure together.

He also likes sleeping. And he’s been doing just that while I write this piece.

Five dogs in, and I’m in love with each one – all with their different sizes, quirks, personalities, sounds, interests, affectionate traits and backgrounds.

House sitting – what’s next?

In mid-August we’re heading off on our own adventure, and we’re going to share it with you here! We’ve been asked by so many people how we got into house sitting – it seems like something you’d only see in a movie. We’re going to test it out though, and share everything with you, so you can do it too.

Crouch End is where we're hanging out for this house sitting this weekend

This lifestyle is ideal for us right now because we:

  • Love dogs
  • Want to travel and see new places and don’t really mind where we end up
  • Intend to work on our digital business so we just need to be somewhere there’s good WiFi
  • Enjoy meeting new people, learning new stories and cultures, and this seems like a perfect opportunity to do all that!

We hope you’ll join us for more stories as the months go by. If you’re interested to find out more about how to travel the world house-sitting, drop us a line in the comments. 

As mentioned, Cooper and I have signed up to TrustedHousesitters – click the link if you’d like to know more or join the service too!

Are you a house and/or pet sitter? Come and join our special Facebook group 😃

 

 

 

This post contains affiliate links. More information on paid advertising on websites can be found here.

 

Secrets of working nomads: a digital nomad’s life?

Secrets of working nomads: a digital nomad’s life?

The lifestyle of working nomads seems enviable, especially if you answer ‘yes’ to these questions:

  • Do you have a good job, but being stuck in the same office space every day makes you feel suffocated?
  • Are you keen to see the world without worrying about how many vacation days you have left?

Thought so.

In this case, have you thought seriously about how to join other working nomads, travelling and making money? ‘Digital nomad’ is probably the most recognised term for this, and it’s not so far out of your reach!

This way of living not only gives you the chance to travel a lot, but saves the money, time and hassle of regular work commutes, not to mention the stress of office politics. Working nomads enjoy the flexibility of location independence.

Is it the dream we think it may be though?

There are some things you have to think of before you make such a decision. If you are not sure about it, continue reading this article and find out a few secrets of working nomads.



 

How do working nomads survive?

How do working nomads really survive? Img: PixaBay

 

You probably already know that digital nomads survive thanks to technology and the internet. The online world offers a great number of freelance jobs and opportunities, and all you need is to be proficient in a skill that allows you to work completely remotely.

If you’re an engineer in construction for example, you might consider changing your career and becoming a web designer, or even a blogger if you feel you’re a creative person. But of course, these are just two of the options available out there.

You don’t necessarily need to become a freelancer, because there are more and more companies that offer remote jobs. All you need to do is begin searching and apply for the ones that are suitable.

After this, you need a laptop, a handle on time management and you’re on your way.

 

Choosing where to work from as a digital nomad

How do working nomads really survive? Img: Pexels.com

 

All people who dream about becoming digital nomads wonder if they can make money while they travel. Yes, of course, you can. And there are so many people who are doing it right now. However, it depends on where you travel and on your abilities to plan your budget, find affordable accommodation, and search for cheap plane tickets. 

For instance, if you travel and live in places like Indonesia, Chiang Mai, or Bali, you will end up paying less on rent, transportation and groceries because these places are less expensive than in many European countries.

Or, you can choose to house and pet sit and secure free accommodation in return for taking good care of someone else’s place and beloved animal friends.

This doesn’t mean you can’t find other good deals in Europe. If you don’t want to live too far from your home country, you can always choose smaller cities and even villages that are cheaper than the busy European capitals.

Some of our favourite working nomads hot spots include Lisbon and Amsterdam. Click the links for a taste of these excellent cities. 

 

Examples for consideration

Let’s say you want to live in Scotland and explore its beauty for a while. Edinburgh and Glasgow are amazing cities, but you might want to settle in a smaller, less touristy place where prices are friendlier. This way, you can you live well and have enough money to travel around. You don’t want to stay in such a beautiful place without learning about its history and seeing its natural wonders, especially since Scotland is full of beautiful hiking paths that blow every visitor’s mind. 

The Ayrshire Coastal Path, declared one of Scotland’s Great Trails by Scottish Natural Heritage is a great place to get closer to the country, see its beauty, and learn about its past.

If you’re looking to settle and work for a while in a more remote place, you should check which of the villages and accommodations surrounding the area offer a great internet connection. Internet and appropriate technology are the first thing to worry about when you are a digital nomad looking for a place to work on the road. 

Scotland is just an example. Spain, Italy, Portugal, Greece and other European countries are great places for digital nomads, as long as you avoid the bigger, more expensive cities or find economical ways to live and stay for a while.

 

Does the life of a working nomad get lonely?

working nomads - on being lonely

 

The truth is that sometimes digital nomads get lonely, especially if you’re travelling solo. But you’re never lonely for long. There are so many people who work while travelling that making new buddies is never difficult.

Yes, sometimes you will have to work instead of exploring the surroundings with your new friends. But this is something normal, isn’t it?

Also, to avoid loneliness, you can always join some of the many Facebook groups dedicated to digital nomads, make an account on Meetup, as well as try to do your job from coffee shops or even coworking spaces. Europe is full of such places where you can rent your desk, work, and mingle with other people just like you. Do keep in mind that these specially created places are not free of charge.

Now you know some of the secrets of digital nomad life. Before deciding to quit your job, make sure you have the right skills for a remote job and try to get in touch with as many digital nomads as possible to find out different stories from different places. It is an important change, after all.

We’d love to hear from you in the comments – are you a digital nomad or would you like to be? Do you have recommendations on the best places to be a working nomad? Or any questions, let us know…

 

About the author:

Rebecca Brown is a translator by day, and a traveller mostly at night. She is an expert on living with jet lag – and packing in tiny suitcases. You can read more of her exploits at RoughDraft.